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Author Topic: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.  (Read 14705 times)

Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« on: February 23, 2011, 09:17:06 AM »
Fresnel lens for input heat, ferrous wheel with low Curie point.

Neodymium magnets.

Look at the pics and critique please.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2011, 09:23:06 AM »
More pics

Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2011, 08:50:17 PM »
Anyone have an opinion on my design? Anyone?

Offline ResinRat2

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2011, 10:07:36 PM »
Sorry Jeff, you need to explain what this is and how it works.

RR2

Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2011, 03:26:20 AM »
Sun shines through Fresnel Lens, onto ferrous wheel bringing it to Curie point.

Neodymium magnet ceases to be attracted to that portion of the wheel and the wheel rotates.

Cool portion of ferrous wheel is brought under the glare of the Fresnel lens, bringing that portion of the ferrous wheel to Curie point.

Wheel rotates and cycle continues.

Water nozzles administer controlled spray volume to keep wheel just below Curie point.

Wheel rotates toward water nozzles.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2011, 03:26:20 AM »
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Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2011, 07:49:45 AM »
Anyone have an opinion? I was hoping someone on here had some critique for me, but it looks like this is too complicated to understand.

Offline fritznien

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 04:47:01 AM »
if all you want is an opinion.
it sounds slow, complicated and of low efficiency and only operating when you have full sunlight.
no output on cloudy days.
did i miss something? is there some advantage i missed?
fritznien

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 04:47:01 AM »
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Offline Jeff_Jepperson

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2011, 07:30:09 AM »
if all you want is an opinion.
it sounds slow, complicated and of low efficiency and only operating when you have full sunlight.
no output on cloudy days.
did i miss something? is there some advantage i missed?
fritznien

How do you know it would be slow? A neodymium with 100 pounds of pull would move the wheel fast. How fast it spins would depend on how fast you could heat up the hot spot (just above the magnet), to the Curie Point .

The water nozzles would emit a fine mist and would be metered to keep the wheel at the desired temp for a given RPM. The spray nozzles could be used to regulate the RPM's.

Complicated? This one I don't get. The Fresnel lens and the magnetic motor assembly would be connected as one unit and would follow the Sun on the same mount. The motor itself has only one moving part, the rotating ferrous wheel.

Low efficiency? Once it is built and operating it requires little maintenance, and no fuel but the Sun. I live in Baja California, in the desert and enjoy 12 hour days of Sun 340 days a year. So the Sun is free for me and millions of others all over the world.

This is my attempt to produce a machine, that gets it's power from the Sun. Your ideas would be appreciated.

What would be a good choice for the ferrous wheel. It needs a low Curie point, tensile strength to transmit the power and hold together under spin, while being unevenly heated.

The closer the gap between the magnet and the wheel the greater the power, but how close can you get? Will the wheel warp as it heats?

A large ( 4 foot ) Fresnel lens will produce as much as 3000 F in an area a few square inches in size. Nickel has a Curie point of about 675 F, if nickel is still magnetic at 655 F, then the lens only has to heat the spot 20 F to turn off the magnetic effect. At that moment the magnet will attract a farther away portion of the wheel, pulling it over top of itself and exposing that portion of the wheel to the heat.

The water nozzles are my idea for temperature control, since I don't think the wheel will have time to cool 20 or so degrees before rotating back to the magnet. Maybe the nozzles aren't necessary, I don't know.

The circumference of the wheel seems to be important too, since this measurement will determine cooling time.

Any advice or opinions or questions will be appreciated.

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 12:49:48 PM »
Hi Jeff,

Have you seen this other idea shown in the first post of this link, you may also use the Fresnel lens instead of the small pieces of mirrors, to make it cheaper or simpler:
http://www.energeticforum.com/renewable-energy/7551-19y-o-kid-covers-satelite-dish-mirrors-creates-death-ray.html

Also you may consider building a much smaller version of the setup shown here:
http://www.energeticforum.com/renewable-energy/7551-19y-o-kid-covers-satelite-dish-mirrors-creates-death-ray.html#post133477

I recall a few years ago in the news it was mentioned that neodymium used together with some other rare earth material would make an excellent refrigarator by having the Curie point for that material mix at 24-26 C°. I do not know where this proposed technics is at now, maybe the price for these materials has gone up in the sky?

I consider your shown setup good, hopefully you can successfully build a test platform to fully explore its possible pitfalls (if there is any) and improve it further.

rgds,  Gyula

PS for those interested in simple "Curie" engines, here is a very simple setup where the candle light could be substituted by Fresnel lens:
http://sci-toys.com/scitoys/scitoys/magnets/curie_engine/curie_engine.html

Offline Low-Q

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2011, 10:42:27 PM »
How do you know it would be slow? A neodymium with 100 pounds of pull would move the wheel fast. How fast it spins would depend on how fast you could heat up the hot spot (just above the magnet), to the Curie Point .

The water nozzles would emit a fine mist and would be metered to keep the wheel at the desired temp for a given RPM. The spray nozzles could be used to regulate the RPM's.

Complicated? This one I don't get. The Fresnel lens and the magnetic motor assembly would be connected as one unit and would follow the Sun on the same mount. The motor itself has only one moving part, the rotating ferrous wheel.

Low efficiency? Once it is built and operating it requires little maintenance, and no fuel but the Sun. I live in Baja California, in the desert and enjoy 12 hour days of Sun 340 days a year. So the Sun is free for me and millions of others all over the world.

This is my attempt to produce a machine, that gets it's power from the Sun. Your ideas would be appreciated.

What would be a good choice for the ferrous wheel. It needs a low Curie point, tensile strength to transmit the power and hold together under spin, while being unevenly heated.

The closer the gap between the magnet and the wheel the greater the power, but how close can you get? Will the wheel warp as it heats?

A large ( 4 foot ) Fresnel lens will produce as much as 3000 F in an area a few square inches in size. Nickel has a Curie point of about 675 F, if nickel is still magnetic at 655 F, then the lens only has to heat the spot 20 F to turn off the magnetic effect. At that moment the magnet will attract a farther away portion of the wheel, pulling it over top of itself and exposing that portion of the wheel to the heat.

The water nozzles are my idea for temperature control, since I don't think the wheel will have time to cool 20 or so degrees before rotating back to the magnet. Maybe the nozzles aren't necessary, I don't know.

The circumference of the wheel seems to be important too, since this measurement will determine cooling time.

Any advice or opinions or questions will be appreciated.
The Curie point does not suddenly turn off the magnetic material. It is a process. At temperatures right below or close to Curie temp., there is very weakattraction.

I think you should focus on materials with less density. Iron and nickel are relatively massive, and slow when it comes to changes in temperature. With all that sun you got each day, you would definitely get more power from a Stirling engine. Let the cool part be under ground, and the hot one, black and matte, towards the sun. No mirrors needed. Just make it bigger with great area. One foot under ground you have maybe 280K, but on the black matte surface you'll probably be able to make scrambled eggs. Let's say 400 - 500K. At one square meter, you'll get pretty much energy.

Vidar

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2011, 10:42:27 PM »
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Offline mscoffman

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Re: Curie point, magnetic, rotating motor.
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2011, 12:53:41 AM »
It might be worthwhile to compare your magnetic method against using
a shape memory metal alloy in some sort of arrangement.

:S:MarkSCoffman

 

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